All Pokemon Main Games

Pokémon Legends: Arceus has been officially released!
Main series release timeline
1996Red and Green
Blue
1997
1998Yellow
Red and Blue
1999Gold and Silver
2000Crystal
2001
2002Ruby and Sapphire
2003
2004FireRed and LeafGreen
Emerald
2005
2006Diamond and Pearl
2007
2008Platinum
2009HeartGold and SoulSilver
2010Black and White
2011
2012Black 2 and White 2
2013X and Y
2014Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire
2015
2016Sun and Moon
2017Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon
2018Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!
2019Sword and Shield
2020The Isle of Armor (DLC)
The Crown Tundra (DLC)
2021Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl
2022Legends: Arceus
Scarlet and Violet

Bulbapedia is currently being updated with the new information.Do not copy information from other fansites without permission.Please remember to follow the manual of style and code of conduct at all times.Check Bulbanews for up-to-date Pokémon news and discuss it on the forums or in the Bulbagarden Discord server. From Bulbapedia, the community-driven Pokémon encyclopedia. The core series[1][2] of the Pokémon games or core games[3], commonly referred to as the main series or mainline games by fans, is the game series for Nintendo video game systems, which follow the standard model of a player's journey through a specific region to catch and raise Pokémon, battle Trainers, fight crime, and earn recognition (usually by collecting Badges from Gym Leaders) until they are acknowledged as the strongest Trainer.

Appearances in other games

Spin-offs Titles

TitleDetails

Original release date:
  • The series has only been released for handheld systems, though this includes the Nintendo Switch which is both a handheld and a home console.
  • Counting each game individually, there are currently 37 games in the series in Western regions, 38 in Japan, 28 in South Korea, and 13 in Greater China.
  • Counting paired games as a single release, there are currently 21 games in the series in Western regions, 22 in Japan, 15 in South Korea, and 7 in Greater China.
  • Prior to Generation VI, it was standard for the Western releases of the core series games to include the label Version in their title, although this was seldom used by the Japanese releases.
Release years by system:
1996 – Game Boy[1]
2016 – 3DS Virtual Console[2]
Notes:
  • In Japanese, Korean, and Chinese, the series is called the Pocket Monsters Series (Japanese: ポケットモンスターシリーズ[4][5], Korean: 포켓몬스터 시리즈[6], Chinese: 精靈寶可夢系列 / 精灵宝可梦系列[7]).
  • Core series games, except Pokémon Legends: Arceus, all contain the full name Pocket Monsters in their Japanese title, whereas side series and spin-off games use the abbreviation Pokémon instead.
  • While the Japanese releases of the Pokémon Stadium series use Pocket Monsters in English subtitles, they use Pokémon in kana in their Japanese names.
  • The Pokémon Video Game Championships are conducted using the core series games. While there are no strict rules that make a game a core series game, and previously assumed rules are continuously broken, the games generally have a similar plot and mechanics.
  • The player begins the game in a small town or city of a given region, having no Pokémon of their own.
  • Through a course of events, the player will receive a starter Pokémon from the region's Pokémon Professor; the starter Pokémon is always a choice of three, a Grass, Fire, or Water type, and the character who will become the player's rival will typically choose (or already have) the Pokémon whose type is super effective against that of the player's choice, although some exceptions to this pattern exist.
  • After this point, the player begins to journey across the entire region (each with their own cities and towns, themselves connected by route), capturing any wild Pokémon they choose to, and using a party they assemble to take on the eight Gym Leaders of the region (or, in the case of the Alola region, the island challenge).
  • Alongside encounters with both other Trainers and repeated interactions with their rival, the player must also stop the plans of a villainous team, which often involve the manipulation of Legendary Pokémon.

Original release date:
  • After all eight Gym Leaders have been defeated or the island challenge has been completed, the player can enter the Pokémon League, where the Elite Four and the Champion of the region await challengers.
(CoroCoro Comic) (retail)
Release years by system:
1996 – Game Boy (CoroCoro Comic)
1999 - Game Boy (retail)
2016 – 3DS Virtual Console
Notes:
  • The Champion is often introduced prior to the player's Pokémon League challenge, and may aid the player on their adventure.
  • Though the game can be considered over as soon as the player has defeated the Champion, there is still post-game content.
  • Often, there is a post-game plotline and locations and facilities that could not be previously accessed.
  • Since Pokémon Crystal, there is usually at least one facility specifically dedicated to battling.
  • The overarching goal is the completion of the Pokédex; after this has been done, the player will receive a diploma for completing the regional Pokédex and, starting in Generation III, another for completing the National Pokédex.
  • While releases continue to break patterns, the release of core series games tends to follow a pattern.

Original release dates:
  • When a generation of Pokémon games begins, a pair of games is always released.
  • These paired versions feature virtually the same storyline as each other, but the available Pokémon differ, and some other elements are usually slightly different.
  • This encourages trading, as it is required in order to complete the Pokédex.
Release years by system:
1998 – Game Boy[4]
2016 – 3DS Virtual Console[5]
Notes:
  • Most generations feature an "upper version"[8] title—often referred to by fans as a "third version"—a follow-up game or pair of games released after the first games of the generation that takes place in the same region with added features.
  • These games typically both share and lack certain regional Pokémon that were available in one or both of the original paired versions; thus, a player of an upper version must link together with the original pair to complete the regional Pokédex as well.
  • On the contrary, upper versions typically contain certain Pokémon from different regions that are unavailable in the original pair, thus being more helpful in completing the National Pokédex.

Original release dates:
  • Until Generation VII, only a single third version following an original pair was ever released at a time; Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon were the first of these games to be released as a pair.
  • Unlike other generations, Generation V opted for a sequel story instead, while Generation VI and Generation VIII entirely forwent follow-up games set in the same region, the latter instead providing added features to the original pair of games via downloadable content in an expansion pass.
Release years by system:
1999 – Game Boy Color[6]
2017 – 3DS Virtual Console
Notes:
  • Sometimes, a secondary set of paired versions that are remakes of earlier titles may also be released.
  • Most generations introduce Pokémon that evolve into or from previously released Pokémon.
  • Legendary Pokémon with myths specific to the region are almost always included, and frequently appear in duos and trios.
  • In all generations, there are some Pokémon that cannot be encountered until after the player becomes Champion.
  • These may be legendary Pokémon, such as Mewtwo, or simply Pokémon that are not part of the game's regional Pokédex.
  • Before the release of a new generation, new Pokémon are often used to promote the new games by including them in the anime or in spin-off games.
  • The box art for each game features one Pokémon which was introduced in that generation (or, in the case of remakes, the generation of the original games).

Original release dates:[9]
  • This Pokémon is referred to by fans as a game mascot, and with the exception of Kanto and Hisui-based games, it is always the Legendary Pokémon available in that game at the climax of the storyline.
  • In terms of the artwork itself, the international Pokémon Red and Blue and all region releases of the initial paired games of each generation from Generation III to VII use their game mascot's original Ken Sugimori artwork for their box art, whereas all other core series games use specially made artwork.
  • The titles in the Japanese games always use some shade of red and blue for either the characters or outlines of the characters.
Release years by system:
2000 – Game Boy Color[9]
2018 – 3DS Virtual Console
Notes:
  • This is most likely in reference to the first internationally released core games of Pokémon Red and Blue.
  • The DLC Expansion Passes for Pokémon Sword and Shield use green and yellow, likely in reference to both Pokémon Red and Green, along with Pokémon Yellow.
  • In South Korea, only Pokémon Gold and Silver were released prior to the foundation of Nintendo of Korea and Pokémon Korea in 2006.
  • The first core series game release after this was Pokémon Diamond and Pearl in 2008.

Original release dates:[11]
  • In Greater China, the first core series game release was Pokémon Sun and Moon in 2016.
  • Several pieces of content in the core series Pokémon games depend on the games having a timeline, but a complete timeline cannot be drawn from the games themselves.
  • On May 7, 2014, Game Freak employee Toshinobu Matsumiya's Twitter account posted a timeline of the core series Pokémon games;[9] the tweet was subsequently deleted, however.
Release years by system:
2002 – Game Boy Advance[11]
Notes:
  • It is unknown if this timeline also applies to all solitary versions and remakes. The plot of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire and Pokémon Red and Green are contemporaneous.
  • They are then followed by the equally contemporaneous plot of Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal and Pokémon Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum, which are set three years later.
  • Pokémon Black and White are set an unspecified amount of time after those games.[note 1]Pokémon Black 2 and White 2 are set two years after those games, and are contemporaneous with Pokémon X and Y[9].
  • Pokémon Sun and Moon and Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon take place two years after the events of Pokémon Black 2 and White 2[10] and at least 10 years after the events of Pokémon Emerald.[note 2]Pokémon Sword and Shield are known to take place after the events of Pokémon Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon because the Pokémon Sword and Shield Pokédex states that research notes of Type: Null were stolen leading to creating more of these Pokémon, in contrast to the three that existed in the previous games.
  • Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee! are implied to happen at most 6 years before Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon.[11].
  • Pokémon Legends: Arceus takes place at most 300 years before Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum.[12].

Original release dates:[16]
  • Furthermore, Zinnia and Team Rainbow Rocket suggest that there are multiple alternate universes.
  • Nintendo, Creatures, and Game Freak have trademarked several titles with the Japan Patent Office which have not currently been used but which fit the naming scheme of the core series games.
  • The following information comes from the Japan Platform for Patent Information:.
Release years by system:
2004 – Game Boy Advance[16]
Notes:
  • Pocket Monsters Topaz (Japanese: ポケットモンスタートパーズ) [application number 2002-063587, registration number 4677891]. Pocket Monsters Tourmaline (Japanese: ポケットモンスタートルマリン) [application number 2002-063588, registration number 4684698].
  • Pocket Monsters Amethyst (Japanese: ポケットモンスターアメジスト) [application number 2002-063589, registration number 4677892].

Original release dates:
  • Pocket Monsters Moonstone (Japanese: ポケットモンスタームーンストーン) [application number 2002-063590, registration number 4684699].
  • Pocket Monsters White Gold (Japanese: ポケットモンスターホワイトゴールド) [application number 2002-063591, registration number 4677893].
  • Pocket Monsters Brown (Japanese: ポケットモンスター茶) [application number 2008-093270, registration number 5222905].
  • Pocket Monsters Gray (Japanese: ポケットモンスター灰) [application number 2008-093272, registration number 5222907].
Release years by system:
2004 – Game Boy Advance
Notes:
  • Gray (Japanese: グレー) [application number 2008-094459, registration number 5406253].
  • Delta Emerald[13] (Japanese: デルタエメラルド) [application number 2014-035118, registration number 5701924].

Original release dates:
  • The following trademarks feature names which are similar to existing game titles:.
  • Pocket Monsters Yellow (Japanese: ポケットモンスター黄) [application number 2008-093268, registration number 5222903].
  • Pocket Monsters Black (Japanese: ポケットモンスター黒) [application number 2008-093269, registration number 5222904].
  • Pocket Monsters White (Japanese: ポケットモンスター白) [application number 2008-093271, registration number 5222906].
Release years by system:
2006 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • Pocket Monsters Vermilion (Japanese: ポケットモンスター朱) [application number 2008-093273, registration number 5222908]. Pocket Monsters Purple (Japanese: ポケットモンスター紫) [application number 2008-093274, registration number 5222909].
  • Pocket Monsters Crimson (Japanese: ポケットモンスター紅) [application number 2008-093275, registration number 5222910].

Original release dates:
  • Pocket Monsters Scarlet (Japanese: ポケットモンスター緋) [application number 2008-093276, registration number 5222911].
  • Pocket Monsters Red (Japanese: ポケットモンスターレッド) [application number 2009-060068, registration number 5341298].
  • Pocket Monsters Green (Japanese: ポケットモンスターグリーン) [application number 2009-060069, registration number 5293290].
  • Pocket Monsters Blue (Japanese: ポケットモンスターブルー) [application number 2009-060070, registration number 5307992].
Release years by system:
2008 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • Pocket Monsters Yellow (Japanese: ポケットモンスターイエロー) [application number 2009-060071, registration number 5341299].
  • Pocket Monsters Brown (Japanese: ポケットモンスターブラウン) [application number 2009-060073, registration number 5307993].

Original release dates:
  • Pocket Monsters Gray (Japanese: ポケットモンスターグレー) [application number 2009-060075, registration number 5341302].
  • Pocket Monsters Vermilion (Japanese: ポケットモンスターヴァーミリオン) [application number 2009-060076, registration number 5307994].
  • Pocket Monsters Purple (Japanese: ポケットモンスターパープル) [application number 2009-060077, registration number 5307995].
  • Pocket Monsters Crimson (Japanese: ポケットモンスタークリムゾン) [application number 2009-060078, registration number 5341303].
Release years by system:
2009 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • The 2002 trademarks were filed around the same time as trademarks for Ruby, Sapphire, Emerald, Diamond, and Pearl, and are all the English names of minerals written in katakana (topaz, tourmaline, amethyst, moonstone, and white gold).
  • The 2008 trademarks were filed alongside trademarks for Red, Green, and Blue, and are all the Japanese names of colors written with a single kanji.

Original release dates:
  • The 2009 trademarks were filed alongside trademarks for Black, White, and Scarlet, and are all the English names of colors written in katakana.
  • Of these, vermilion, crimson, and scarlet are shades of red.
  • Contrary to what is sometimes reported, the name WaterBlue was not trademarked by Nintendo, Creatures, or Game Freak.
  • However, Game Freak's Junichi Masuda did mention "WaterBlue" in 2004 on a blog post explaining the company's choice of "FireRed" and "LeafGreen" as both Japanese and international titles for the remakes of Red and Green.[14][15].
Release years by system:
2010 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • In addition to the core series games, each of the side series games allow players to transfer their Pokémon to and from the core series:.
  • Pokémon Stadium: Allows players to transfer their Pokémon from the Generation I core series games to battle in 3D.
  • Pokémon Stadium 2: Allows players to transfer their Pokémon from the Generation I and II core series games to battle in 3D.

Original release dates:
  • Pokémon Box Ruby & Sapphire: Allows players to store their Pokémon from the Generation III core series games.
  • Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness: Can trade Pokémon with the Generation III core series games.
  • Pokémon Battle Revolution: Allows players to transfer their Pokémon from the Generation IV core series games to battle in 3D.
  • My Pokémon Ranch: Allows players to store their Pokémon from Pokémon Diamond and Pearl (and from Pokémon Platinum in Japan).
Release years by system:
2012 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • Pokémon Dream World: Allows players to send Pokémon caught in this game to the Generation V core series games.
  • Pokémon Dream Radar: Allows players to receive the Forces of Nature in their Therian Formes in Black 2 and White 2.

Original release date:[20]
  • Poké Transporter: Allows players to transfer their Pokémon from the Generation V games, and the Generation I and II games on Nintendo 3DSVirtual Console, to Pokémon Bank.
Release years by system:
2013 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Pokémon Bank: Allows players to store their Pokémon from Generation VI and VII core series games.
  • Pokémon Omega Ruby and Pokémon Alpha Sapphire Special Demo Version: Allows players to receive a Steelix and/or a Glalie with their respective Mega Stones in Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire.
  • Pokémon Sun and Pokémon Moon Special Demo Version: Allows players to receive a Greninja with the Ability Battle Bond in Pokémon Sun and Moon.
  • Pokémon HOME: Allows players to store their Pokémon from Generation VIII games, and can transfer Pokémon from Pokémon Bank, Pokémon Let's Go, and Pokémon GO to its own storage.
  • Additionally, some spin-off games allow players to receive special Pokémon:.
  • Pokémon Pikachu 2 GS: Allows players to convert Watts accumulated by walking into items to be sent to the Generation II games.

Original release date:[21]
  • Pokémon Channel: In the European and Australian versions of the game, it allows players to receive a gift Jirachi in the Generation III core series games.
  • Pokémon Ranger series: Allows players to receive a special Manaphy Egg and other special Pokémon in the Generation IV core series games through Ranger Net missions.
  • Pokéwalker: Allows players to store their Pokémon from Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver to gain experience by walking.
  • Additionally, Pokémon caught in the Pokéwalker can be transferred to Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver.
Release years by system:
2014 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Pokémon GO: Allows players to transfer Generation I Pokémon caught in this game to Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu!
  • and Let's Go, Eevee! Allows players to transfer most Pokémon caught in this game to Pokémon HOME via the GO Transporter.

Original release date:[22]
  • Pokémon Pass: Allows players to receive serial codes for a ShinyPikachu or a Shiny Eevee in Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu!
  • and Let's Go, Eevee!
  • Spin-off Pokémon games.
  • ↑Pokémon Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun, and Ultra Moon are known to be set 10-20 years after the Generation I core series games and Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald.[note 2][note 3] Due to the known durations between other games, it can be calculated that Pokémon Black and White are set 3-13 years after Pokémon Gold, Silver, Crystal, Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum.
Release years by system:
2016 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • ↑ 2.02.1In Pokémon Sun and Moon, it is mentioned that Anabel fell through an Ultra Wormhole 10 years ago.
  • Since she appeared in Pokémon Emerald before falling through the wormhole, Pokémon Sun and Moon cannot be set less than 10 years after Pokémon Emerald.
  • ↑Porygon's Pokémon Sun, Ultra Sun, and Ultra Moon Pokédex entries state that it was created 20 years ago.
  • Since Porygon exists in the Generation I games, they cannot be set more than 20 years earlier than the games in which the Pokédex entries appear.
  • ↑Iwata Asks : Pokémon X & Pokémon Y : Pokémon Born Anew.

Original release date:[23]
  • ↑Pokemon's Master Speaks - IGN.
Release years by system:
2017 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • ↑Inside the Minds behind Pokémon! | News | Pokemon.com. ↑ゲーム ポケットモンスターシリーズ | ポケットモンスターオフィシャルサイト (archive).
  • ↑포켓몬 공식 사이트 (archive). ↑Nintendo SpotLight E3 2017 (附中文字幕) - YouTube.
  • ↑Nintendo UK YouTube: Pokémon Ultra Sun & Pokémon Ultra Moon Introduction – Episode 4 – A new Pokémon adventure awaits.

Original release date(s):[24][25][26]
  • ↑ 9.09.1archive.is (archived from the original).
Release years by system:
2018 – Nintendo Switch only
Notes:
  • ↑Pokémon Sun and Moon Grimsleysettei. ↑Pokémon Let's Go Pikachu Eevee Minasettei.
  • ↑Spiritomb's Pokémon Pearl Pokédex entry states that it was locked away 500 years ago. Since Spiritomb appears in the game and Vessa says it was sealed "hundreds of years ago", it cannot be set more than 300 years before Generation IV.
  • ↑Pokemon Delta Emerald Trademark Surfaces - IGN. ↑HIDDEN POWER of masuda. The Pokémon Company website game list: has "Pocket Monsters Series" filter (Japanese)The Pokémon Company "Pocket Monsters Series" page (archive) (Japanese)The Pokémon Company "Pocket Monsters Series" product list (archive) (Japanese).
  • The Pokémon Company "Pocket Monsters Series" page (archive) (Japanese). The Pokémon Company "Pocket Monsters Series" product list (archive) (Japanese).

Original release date(s):[27][28]
  • Pokémon Korea website section(Korean).
Release years by system:
2019 – Nintendo Switch
Notes:
  • Nintendo subsite for Pokémon games(Japanese). Pokémon game templates. Retrieved from "https://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/w/index.php?title=Core_series&oldid=3501521".
  • Currently there are 8 Generations in the Pokémon series, spanning from the Japanese releases of Red, Green and Blue in 1996 to Sword and Shield in 2019.
  • These generations create a timeline that is seemingly broken down into sections based on when each new Pokémon region was released.
  • However, the timeline is actually based more on which year each game was released, regardless of the region the game takes place in, and this can be confusing for players.
  • A way to help break down where each game falls on the timeline, including each of the Pokémon remakes, is to look at the year the game came out. Using consoles used to be a good way to know where on the timeline games fell, but hasn't so reliable since the Nintendo DS hosted multiple generations.

Original release date(s):
  • Pokémon generations have since had overlap on the 3DS, as well as the Nintendo Switch, making is much harder to distinguish timelines based on the platform the games can be played on.
Release years by system:
2021 – Nintendo Switch
Notes:
  • SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY. Related: Best Pokémon Console Games (Before Sword & Shield).

Original release dates:
  • Many older Pokémon games have become dated, and no longer available on modern platforms, forcing players to find outdated systems and vintage cartridges to play them.
Release years by system:
2022 – Nintendo Switch
Notes:
  • Because of this, many of the older games needed true remakes, or to be ported forward onto newer systems.

Original release dates:
  • Remakes like Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire take up a new spot on the game timeline in Generation 6, far from the original Ruby and Sapphire, which are considered the 3rd Generation.
Release years by system:
2022 – Nintendo Switch
Notes:
  • Below is the timeline to date for the main Pokémon games according to the fandom wiki Bulbapedia.

Reception

Seventh generation (2016–2019)

TitleDetails

Original release date:[29]
  • The timeline is arranged to show the generation, console the games were released on, and year the titles hit the market.
Release years by system:
1998 – Nintendo 64
Notes:
  • This will help players visualized where all the main series games fall on the Pokémon timeline.
  • This doesn't include games like Pokémon Ranger or Pokémon Snap, which aren't part of the game's main series.

Original release dates:[30]
  • Generation 1: 1996-1999 - Game Boy - Red, Blue, Green and Yellow.
  • Generation 2: 1999-2002 - Game Boy Color - Gold, Silver and Crystal.
  • Generation 3: 2002-2006 - Game Boy Advance - Ruby, Sapphire, LeafGreen, FireRed, and Emerald.
  • Generation 4: 2006-2010 - Nintendo DS - Diamond, Pearl, HeartGold, SoulSilver, and Platinum.
Release years by system:
1999 – Nintendo 64
Notes:
  • Generation 5: 2010-2013 - Nintendo DS - Black, White, Black 2, and White 2.
  • Generation 6: 2013-2016 - Nintendo 3DS - X, Y, Omega Ruby, and Alpha Sapphire. Generation 7: 2016-2019 - Nintendo 3DS/Nintendo Switch - Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun, Ultra Moon, Let's Go Pikachu!

Original release dates:[32]
  • and Let's Go Eevee!
  • Generation 8: 2019-Present - Nintendo Switch - Sword and Shield (Plus Isle of Armor and Crown Tundra DLC).
  • It is likely that the potential remakes of Diamond and Pearl, which have been stirring rumors online, will be a part of Generation 8 with Pokémon Sword and Shield.
Release years by system:
2000 – Nintendo 64
Notes:
  • While it is currently unclear what the developer's plans may be for the Pokémon's Generation 9, players will likely see the games continue to release on the Nintendo Switch for the time being, potentially utilizing more of the open world mechanics and DLC additions that were a part of recent titles.
  • Next: Top Four Starter Pokémon According to Data. Source: Bulbapedia. LEGO Star Wars: Skywalker Saga - Every Active Cheat Code (April 2022).

Generation VI (Nintendo 3DS)

TitleDetails

Original release dates:
  • Pokémon[a] is a series of video games developed by Game Freak and published by Nintendo and The Pokémon Company under the Pokémon media franchise.
  • It was created by Satoshi Tajiri with assistance from Ken Sugimori, the first games, Pocket Monsters Red and Green, released in 1996 in Japan for the Game Boy, later released outside of Japan as Pokémon Red and Blue.
  • The main series of role-playing video games (RPGs), referred as the "core series" by their developers,[1][2][3] have continued on each generation of Nintendo's handhelds.
  • The most recently released core series game, Pokémon Legends: Arceus, was released on January 28, 2022, for the Nintendo Switch.
Release years by system:
2003 – GameCube
Notes:
  • It is a prequel to the 2006 Nintendo DS games Pokémon Diamond and Pearl.

Original release dates:[34]
  • The core games are released in generations, each with different Pokémon, storylines, and characters.
  • Remakes of the games are usually released around a decade after the original versions for the latest console at the time.
  • While the main series consists of RPGs developed by Game Freak, many spin-off games based on the series have been developed by various companies, encompassing other genres such as action role-playing, puzzle, fighting, and digital pet games.
Release years by system:
2003 – GameCube
Notes:
  • Pokémon is estimated to be the largest media franchise, with successful anime series, movies, and merchandise, with spin-off game Pokémon Go having crossed 1billion mobile game downloads worldwide.[4] By November 24, 2017, more than 300 million Pokémon games had been sold worldwide on handheld and home consoles, across 76 titles, including spin-offs.[5] As of March 2021, the series has sold over 380 million units worldwide.[6] This makes Pokémon the fourth best-selling video game franchise, behind Nintendo's own Mario franchise, Tetris and Call of Duty.

Original release dates:[35]
  • All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation.
  • These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; when an official sequel in the main role-playing game series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and possibly new gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise.
  • The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, manga, and trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins.
  • The franchise began its eighth and current generation with Pokémon Sword and Shield, which were released worldwide for the Nintendo Switch on November 15, 2019.
Release years by system:
2005 – GameCube
Notes:
  • The original Pokémon games are Japanese role-playing video games (RPGs) with an element of strategy and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy.

Original release dates:[36]
  • The Pokémon series began with the release of Pocket Monsters Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan.
  • When these games proved popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release.
  • The original Green version was not released outside Japan.[7] Afterwards, a second enhanced remake, Pokémon Yellow, was released to use the color palette of the Game Boy Color and more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime.
  • This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players.
Release years by system:
2006 – Wii
Notes:
  • These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation.

Original release dates:
  • Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball; an adaptation of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color; an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap; a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaptation of Tetris Attack, Pokémon Puzzle League.
  • A 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handhelds' battle system, Pokémon Stadium; and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8] At the Nintendo Space World in 2000, a game was revealed briefly with Meowth and Team Rocket singing a song.
  • This was one of the earliest introductions of the Pokémon Togepi and Bellossom.
  • This game was called Meowth's Party, but was not developed into a playable game.
Release years by system:
2008 – WiiWare
Notes:
  • Instead, the song/video was played at the end of an episode of Pokémon, and a CD was made for retail in Japan for a limited time.

Original release dates:
  • This is the first time Missingno.
  • The second generation of Pokémon video games began in 1999 with the Japanese release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for the Game Boy Color, with Australia and North America getting the game in October 2000 and European release date of April 2001.
  • Like the previous generation, an enhanced version, titled Pokémon Crystal, was later released.
  • This generation introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle.
Release years by system:
2012 - DS
Notes:
  • New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full use of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics and equipable items (a new addition); the addition of two new Pokémon types (Dark and Steel) to better balance the strengths and weaknesses of each Pokémon; Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto.

List of core series games

Classification

5th-Gen: Black, White, Black 2, White 2

TitleDetails

Original release dates:[37]
  • After exploring Johto, the player can travel east to explore the adjacent Kanto region.
  • Spin-off games in the second-generation include Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, the adaptation of Pokémon Puzzle League—a puzzle game created by Zoppf industries—made specifically for the Game Boy Color; the Nintendo 64pet simulatorHey You, Pikachu!; the Pokémon Stadium sequel, Pokémon Stadium 2, for Nintendo 64; several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader; and a co-starring role for several Pokémon species in the Super Smash Bros.
  • sequel Super Smash Bros.
  • Melee for the GameCube.[9] The Pokémon mini was a handheld game console released in December 2001 in Japan and 2002 in Europe and North America.
Release years by system:
1998 – Game Boy Color
2014 – 3DS Virtual Console
Notes:
  • This generation started a trend among even-numbered generations, giving the Pokémon Eevee new type evolutions beyond the original three of the first generation.

Original release dates:[38]
  • A screenshot of Pokémon Emerald featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.
Release years by system:
2001 – Game Boy Color
Notes:
  • Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2002 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Green, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen (Red and Green representing the original Japanese first generation games; territories outside Japan instead saw releases of Red and Blue).
  • An enhanced version of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald followed after.

Fifth generation (2010–2013)

TitleDetails

Original release dates:[39]
  • The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species.
  • It also features a more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, "natures" which affect Pokémon stats, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, the new region of Hoenn, the ability to select the protagonist's gender and Secret Bases: customizable "rooms" where the player can display items they have collected in-game and battle against real friends.
Release years by system:
1999 – Windows
Notes:
  • Secret Bases can be found in bushes, trees, or small cave openings in landscapes by using the Pokémon move, Secret Power, which can be taught to virtually all Pokémon.

Original release dates:[40]
  • However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation (which was removed due to internal-battery save problems), and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions).
  • Around this time that the franchise was regaining its popularity and it managed to ship over 100 million games worldwide.[10][11].
Release years by system:
2000 – Windows
Notes:
  • Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby & Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Blue Rescue Team and Red Rescue Team for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei!

Generation I (Game Boy)

TitleDetails

Original release dates:
  • and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box: Ruby & Sapphire for GameCube; and two role-playing games for the GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness.
Release years by system:
2011 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • In 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS.
  • The games were released in North America on April 22, 2007, and in Australia on June 21, 2007.

Original release dates:
  • The game was released in the UK and Europe on July 27, 2007.[12] Other main series games in the fourth generation include Pokémon Platinum, a director's cut version of Diamond and Pearl in the same vein as Pokémon Yellow, Crystal, and Emerald.[13][14] It was released for the Nintendo DS in Japan on September 13, 2008,[15] in North America on March 22, 2009,[16][17] and in Australia and Europe on May 14, 2009[18] and May 22, 2009[19] respectively.
Release years by system:
2019 – iOS, Android
Notes:
  • It was also announced that Pokémon Gold and Silver would be remade for the Nintendo DS as Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver.[20] Released in Japan on September 12, 2009, the games were later released to North America, Australia, and Europe during March 2010.[21][22][23].

Main Titles of Pokemon Saga

TitleDetails

Original release dates:[41]
  • The fourth-generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arceus), bringing the number of Pokémon species to 493.
  • This generation is the first to have 3D graphics in the main series game, although it is still a mixture of both 3D graphics and sprites.
  • New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests", and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld.
  • Secret Bases also appear in Sinnoh but can only be created and housed in Sinnoh's underground.
Release years by system:
1999 – Game Boy Color
Notes:
  • HeartGold and SoulSilver also introduced the Pokéathlon to the Johto region, which consists of many Pokémon based sporting events making use of the stylus.

Original release dates:[42]
  • Spin-off games in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which has Wi-Fi connectivity as well[24]), Pokémon Ranger: Shadows of Almia and Pokémon Ranger: Guardian Signs for Nintendo DS, Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness and their sister game, Explorers of Sky all for the Nintendo DS, and a co-starring role for Pikachu, Jigglypuff, Lucario, and a Pokémon Trainer (who uses Squirtle, Ivysaur, and Charizard for fighting) in the 2008 Wii fighterSuper Smash Bros.
  • The fifth generation of Pokémon began on September 18, 2010, with the release of Pokémon Black and White in Japan.
  • They were then released in North America, Europe, and Australia in March 2011.
  • They have released on the Nintendo DS, the same console as its predecessing generation.
Release years by system:
2003 – Game Boy Advance
2015 – Wii U Virtual Console
Notes:
  • The games take place in the Unova region.

Timeline

TitleDetails

Original release dates:[43][44]
  • This generation introduced a total of 156 new Pokémon (beginning with Victini and ending with Genesect), the most of any generation so far.
  • It was also the first generation where the first new Pokémon in National Pokédex order (Victini) is not a starter.
  • It also introduced another new feature, the seasons, which two Pokémon (Deerling and Sawsbuck) represent.
  • Unlike previous generations, which would introduce some species of Pokémon that were evolutionary relatives of older-generation Pokémon, the fifth generation's selection was all-original, in an attempt to make the primary versions feel like a brand-new game.
Release years by system:
2005 – Game Boy Advance, Nintendo DS
2016 – Wii U Virtual Console
Notes:
  • The other main series games, and the additions to Black and White, titled Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, are direct sequels.
  • They take place in the Unova region two years later and were released in Japan on June 23, 2012, and in North America, Australia, and Europe in October of that year for Nintendo DS.
  • They are somewhat different of their predecessors; there are different protagonist trainers, and many of the other important characters have changed as well.
  • The games also introduced a new feature, the "Pokémon World Tournament", where trainers can battle gym leaders and champions from older regions, including Unova.

Original release dates:[45][46]
  • The games also broke the tradition of releasing a third version as an addition to the primary versions.
  • Spin-off fifth generation games include sequels Pokémon Rumble Blast and Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity for Nintendo 3DS, PokéPark 2: Wonders Beyond for Wii, and Pokémon Rumble U for Wii U, a downloadable game.
  • Others include Learn with Pokémon: Typing Adventure (a typing game) and Pokémon Conquest (a crossover game) for Nintendo DS, and downloadable reference applications Pokédex 3D, Pokédex 3D Pro (for Nintendo 3DS), and Pokédex for iOS (for iOS devices), which allows players to view information of Pokémon species while they have 3D models.
  • Various fifth generation Pokémon have appeared in Super Smash Bros.
Release years by system:
2007 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U and Super Smash Bros.

Original release dates:[47]
  • Ultimate including Reshiram and Zekrom, Klinklang, Axew, Druddigon, and more.
  • On December 24, 2012, Japanese magazine Nintendo Dream posted a greetings card sent out by Game Freak.
  • In the card, Junichi Masuda exclaimed that during 2013, they intend to further evolve the world of Pokémon.
  • On December 29, 2012, a new Pokémon Black 2 and White 2 commercial aired in Japan, and ending with a message, informing Pokémon fans that the latest news would be announced on January 8, 2013.
Release years by system:
2009 – Nintendo DS
2016 – Wii U Virtual Console
Notes:
  • On January 4, 2013, both the Japanese and English Pokémon website confirmed that an announcement would be made on January 8.
  • On January 7, 2013, the Japanese website explained that the Nintendo president, Satoru Iwata would hold a 10-minute "Pokémon Direct" video conference to announce the big Pokémon news.

Original release date:[48]
Release years by system:
2009 – WiiWare
Notes:
  • This generation introduced a total of 72 new Pokémon, the new Fairy type, Mega Evolution, the Kalos region, Trainer customization, Super Training, and three new battle modes: Sky Battles, Horde Encounters, and Inverse Battle.
  • This generation is also the first to be compatible with Pokémon Bank.
  • Greninja, the final evolved form of Froakie, would later go on to represent the sixth generation of Pokémon in the hit fighting game, Super Smash Bros.

Original release dates:[49]
  • for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U.
  • On May 7, 2014, Nintendo revealed the games Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire in a teaser trailer, remakes of the third generation games Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire.
  • They were released worldwide in November 2014.[30].
  • On August 26, 2014, Pokkén Tournament was announced and was released on July 16, 2015, in Japanese arcades and was released on March 18, 2016, worldwide for Wii U.
Release years by system:
2012 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • It was developed by Bandai Namco Entertainment.[31] In July 2016, Niantic and Nintendo released a free-to-play augmented reality game titled Pokémon Go which was released for Android and iOS devices.[32].
  • During a Nintendo Direct presentation on February 26, 2016, two new Pokémon titles were announced, titled Pokémon Sun and Moon.

Original release dates:[50]
  • The games were released on the Nintendo 3DS on November 18, 2016, in Japan, North America, and Australia, and in Europe on November 23, 2016.[33] The games were the first since the second generation to be backwards-compatible with other titles, including Pokémon X and Y; Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire; and the Virtual Console re-releases of Pokémon Red, Blue and Yellow.
  • On June 6, 2017, Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon were announced.
  • The two games offer new additions to the story of Pokémon Sun and Moon, including new features, and was released worldwide on the Nintendo 3DS on November 17, 2017.[34] On May 29, 2018, two new Pokémon games in the main Pokémon franchise, Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu!
  • and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee!, were announced.
Release years by system:
2015 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • They are remakes of Pokémon Yellow with gameplay mechanics borrowed from Pokémon Go and were released worldwide on the Nintendo Switch on November 16, 2018.
  • In total, this generation introduced 88 new Pokémon, Alolan forms, trials, Z-moves, Poké Pelago, and Festival Plaza.

Original release date:
  • It was also the first one to introduce Pokémon mid-generation, with five new Pokémon making their debut in Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon, and two new Pokémon debuting in Let's Go, Pikachu!
Release years by system:
2020 – Nintendo Switch
Notes:
  • and Let's Go, Eevee! During E3 2017, Nintendo and The Pokémon Company announced that Game Freak was developing a new core Pokémon role-playing game set to release for the Nintendo Switch[35] in "2018 or later."
  • [36][37] The game is the eighth generation of Pokémon.[38].
  • Along with the announcement of Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu!

External links

TitleDetails

Original release dates:[51]
  • and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee!
  • it was confirmed that another core Pokémon role-playing game would be released in late 2019.
  • It was clarified that the 2019 game was the one mentioned during E3 2017, not the Let's Go games.
  • Game director Junichi Masuda stated that it would also "follow in the tradition of Pokémon X and Y and Pokémon Sun and Moon".[39][40] The CEO of The Pokémon Company, Tsunekazu Ishihara, also confirmed that the upcoming core title would not have influences from Pokémon Go like Let's Go, Pikachu!
Release years by system:
2006 – Nintendo DS
2016 – Wii U Virtual Console
Notes:
  • and Let's Go, Eevee! On February 27, 2019, on the 23rd anniversary of the franchise, Pokémon Sword and Shield were confirmed for Nintendo Switch, which were released worldwide on November 15, 2019.[43][44].

Original release dates:[52]
  • The eighth-generation takes place in the Galar region and introduced 81 new Pokémon, Galarian forms, the Champion Cup, Dynamax, Gigantamax forms, Max Raid battles, and Pokémon Camp.
  • On January 9, 2020, two expansion packs titled The Isle of Armor and The Crown Tundra were announced.
  • The Isle of Armor was released on June 17, 2020, and The Crown Tundra was released on October 22, 2020.[45].
  • On November 26, 2020, at the Macy's Thanksgiving parade, Pokémon teased its 2021 25th anniversary logo and details for its special celebration "soon".[46].
Release years by system:
2008 – Nintendo DS
2016 – Wii U Virtual Console
Notes:
  • On February 26, 2021, Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl were announced, remakes of the fourth generation games Pokémon Diamond and Pearl developed by ILCA and set to release later that year.

Original release dates:[53]
  • On the same day, Pokémon Legends: Arceus was announced, a prequel to Diamond and Pearl.
  • Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl were released on November 19, 2021, while Arceus was released on January 28, 2022.
  • On February 27, 2022, Pokémon Scarlet and Violet were announced for the Nintendo Switch, with a late 2022 release date.[47].
  • One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games—spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Game Boy to the Nintendo 3DS games Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon—is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon".[48] Players can choose a Pokémon type — Grass-type, Fire-type, or Water-type Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[49] For example, in Pokémon Red and Blue, the player has the choice of starting with Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle.
Release years by system:
2010 – Nintendo DS
2016 – Wii U Virtual Console
Notes:
  • The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow, where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; unique to Pokémon Yellow, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player.[50].

Pokémon Games Compatibility

TitleDetails

Original release dates:
  • Another consistent aspect is that the player's rival will always choose the type that has a type advantage over the player's chosen Pokémon as their starter Pokémon (excluding Sun and Moon and Sword and Shield.).
  • For instance, if the player picks the Fire-type Charmander, the rival will always pick the Water-type Squirtle.
  • This does not affect the first battle between the rivals, as they can only use Normal-type attacks at this point, meaning that they cannot exploit weaknesses.
Release years by system:
2009 – WiiWare
Notes:
  • The exception to this is again Pokémon Yellow, in which the rival picks Eevee, a Normal-type Pokémon with multiple evolutions.

Original release dates:
  • Sun and Moon also is an exception is this rule, as the rival picks the starter weak toward the player's starter, with the Pokémon that has the type advantage going to a trainer in the Champion battle.
  • However, in Pokémon Black and White, there are two rivals; one picks the Pokémon with a type advantage over the player's chosen Pokémon, while the other chooses the Pokémon with the type disadvantage.
  • In Pokémon Diamond, Pearl and Platinum, another Trainer chooses the Pokémon with a type disadvantage to the player's chosen Pokémon, but never battles the player; instead, this character battles alongside the player as a tag partner in certain situations.
Release years by system:
2011 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • The situation is similar in Pokémon X and Y, but there are four rivals.
  • Two of them receive the starter Pokémon in an arrangement similar to Pokémon Black and White, but the other two have completely different Pokémon.[51].

Original release dates:[54]
  • Pocket Monsters: Red and Green (JPFebruary 27, 1996).
  • Pocket Monsters: Blue (JPOctober 15, 1996).
  • Pokémon Red and Blue (NASeptember 28, 1998, AUSOctober 23, 1998, EUOctober 5, 1999).
Release years by system:
2013 – Wii U
Notes:
  • Pokémon Yellow (JPSeptember 12, 1998, NAOctober 19, 1999, EUJune 16, 2000, AUSSeptember 3, 1999).
  • Pokémon Gold and Silver (JPNovember 21, 1999, AUSOctober 13, 2000, NAOctober 14, 2000, EUApril 6, 2001, KOApril 23, 2002).

Original release date:[55]
  • Pokémon Crystal (JPDecember 14, 2000, NAJuly 29, 2001, AUSSeptember 30, 2001, EUNovember 2, 2001).
Release years by system:
2015 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire (JPNovember 21, 2002, NAMarch 18, 2003, AUSApril 3, 2003, EUJuly 25, 2003).
  • Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen (JPJanuary 29, 2004, NASeptember 7, 2004, AUSSeptember 23, 2004, EUOctober 1, 2004).
  • Pokémon Emerald (JPSeptember 16, 2004, NAApril 30, 2005, AUSJune 9, 2005, EUOctober 21, 2005). Pokémon Diamond and Pearl (JPSeptember 28, 2006, NAApril 22, 2007, AUSJune 21, 2007, EUJuly 27, 2007, KOFebruary 14, 2008).

Original release date(s):
  • Pokémon Platinum (JPSeptember 13, 2008, NAMarch 22, 2009, AUSMay 14, 2009, EUMay 22, 2009, KOJuly 2, 2009).
Release years by system:
2019 – Android, iOS
Notes:
  • Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver (JPSeptember 12, 2009, KOFebruary 4, 2010, NAMarch 14, 2010, AUSMarch 25, 2010, EUMarch 26, 2010).
  • Pokémon Black and White (JPSeptember 18, 2010, EUMarch 4, 2011, NAMarch 6, 2011, AUSMarch 10, 2011, KOApril 21, 2011).

Notable Stand-alone Pokémon Games

TitleDetails

Original release dates:[56]
  • Pokémon Black 2 and White 2 (JPJune 23, 2012, NAOctober 7, 2012, AUSOctober 11, 2012, EUOctober 12, 2012).
  • Pokémon X and Y (WWOctober 12, 2013).
  • Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire (JP/NA/AUSNovember 21, 2014,EUNovember 28, 2014).
Release years by system:
1999 – Nintendo 64
2007 – Wii Virtual Console
2017 – Wii U Virtual Console
Notes:
  • Pokémon Sun and Moon (JP/NA/AUSNovember 18, 2016, EUNovember 23, 2016).

Original release date:[57][58]
  • Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon (WWNovember 17, 2017).
Release years by system:
2021 – Nintendo Switch
Notes:
  • Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu!

Gameplay

Generation VII (Nintendo 3DS & Nintendo Switch)

TitleDetails

Original release dates:[59]
  • and Let's Go, Eevee!
  • (WWNovember 16, 2018).
Release years by system:
2000 – Nintendo 64
2008 – Wii Virtual Console
Notes:
  • Pokémon Sword and Shield (WWNovember 15, 2019[39][40][38]).

Original release dates:[60]
  • Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl (WWNovember 19, 2021).
  • Pokémon Legends: Arceus (WWJanuary 28, 2022).
  • Pokémon Scarlet and Violet (WW2022).
Release years by system:
2000 – Game Boy Color
2014 – 3DS Virtual Console
Notes:
  • Several Pokémon PC games were released for Microsoft Windows and Macintosh.

7th-Gen: Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun, Ultra Moon

TitleDetails

Original release dates:
  • Games from the franchise were also released in Japan for Sega consoles Pico and Advanced Pico Beena.
  • Pokémon are also in Mario Artist: Paint Studio for Nintendo 64DD as pasteable stickers,[52] and they also appear in Picross NP Vol.
  • 1 for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System.
  • In the Super Smash Bros.
Release years by system:
2005 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • series, Pikachu, Ivysaur, Squirtle, Charizard, Jigglypuff, Pichu, Mewtwo, Lucario, Greninja, and Incineroar have been playable characters.

Original release date:
  • Pikachu and Jigglypuff are introduced in Super Smash Bros.
  • for the Nintendo 64, and appear in every installment of the franchise.
  • Pichu and Mewtwo feature as playable characters in Super Smash Bros.
  • Melee for the GameCube.
Release years by system:
2014 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • In Super Smash Bros. Brawl for the Wii, Mewtwo and Pichu are not featured as playable characters, although Squirtle, Ivysaur, and Charizard make their first playable appearances as part of the Pokémon Trainer character, while Lucario appears as a separate character.

Pokkén Tournament (2016)

TitleDetails

Original release date:
  • Greninja made its first appearance in Super Smash Bros.
Release years by system:
2015 – Nintendo 3DS, iOS, Android
Notes:
  • for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U, Charizard is a standalone character, and Mewtwo returns as a downloadable content character.

Original release dates:[61]
  • All of the Pokémon that are playable in previous Smash Bros.
  • games return in the Nintendo Switch game Super Smash Bros.
  • Ultimate, which also features Incineroar.
  • Squirtle, Ivysaur, and Charizard are again playable as a part of the Pokémon Trainer character in Ultimate.
Release years by system:
2015 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Some of the Pokémon also appear as Spirits.

Original release date(s):
  • Rayquaza is featured as a boss enemy in Super Smash Bros.
Release years by system:
2020 - Nintendo Switch, Android, iOS
Notes:
  • The series features Poké Balls as items, which, when used by a player, make a random Pokémon appear including Piplup, Bonsly, and Munchlax, with various effects on the game, and Super Smash Bros.

See also

TitleDetails

Original release dates:[62]
  • for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U have Master Balls, which function like Poké Balls but only summon a rare Pokémon (like Mew, Palkia, and Genesect) or Goldeen.
  • Several Pokémon also appear as stage hazards/in stages, including Rayquaza, Ho-Oh and Manaphy.
Release years by system:
1998 – Nintendo 64
Notes:
  • The Pokémon video game series is the basis of the Pokémon franchise, which includes the Pokémon anime, the Pokémon Trading Card Game, the Pokémon manga, and various toys.

Original release dates:
  • The anime series has run for over 900 episodes, accompanied by 19 feature films, with a twentieth in production.
  • The trading card game and its expansion sets have grown to around 3,000 unique cards in total, and continue to draw a healthy player base to its official international tournaments.
  • The extent of global toy and merchandise sales since 1996 cover broad markets and high quantities.[122].
Release years by system:
2003 – GameCube
Notes:
  • IGN ranked Pokémon as the 17th greatest desired game series: "the basic gameplay premise boasts solid, addictive play mechanics, and several of the handheld RPGs deserve to be in every gamer's collection.[123]GamesRadar listed Pokémon as the No.

References

Pokémon: Mystery Dungeon series (2005 – 2020)

TitleDetails

Original release date:
  • 1 Nintendo game "not made by Nintendo", stating that having to catch each Pokémon made the games addictive.[124].
Release years by system:
2007 – Arcade
Notes:
  • On September 28, 2018, Junichi Masuda revealed that during the early years of developing Pokémon games that "game data was nearly lost in a computer crash".
  • Masuda described it as "the most nerve-racking moment in development", saying "“We were developing the game on these Unix computer stations called the SunSPARCstation 1.
  • We’re developing, and they’re these Unix boxes, and they crashed quite a bit".[125]. iwataasks.nintendo.com.

Original release date:[64]
  • Archived from the original on June 19, 2018.
Release years by system:
2012 – Arcade
Notes:
  • Retrieved June 25, 2018. ^"Inside the Minds behind Pokémon!
  • | News | Pokemon.com".
  • October 4, 2013. Archived from the original on October 8, 2013.
  • Retrieved June 25, 2018. ^MacDonald, Keza (February 16, 2011). "Pokemon's Master Speaks". Archived from the original on June 26, 2018.

Original release date:[65][66]
  • Retrieved June 25, 2018.
Release years by system:
2013 – Nintendo 3DS, Arcade
Notes:
  • ^Webster, Andrew (February 28, 2019).
  • "Pokémon Go spurred an amazing era that continues with Sword and Shield". Archived from the original on July 15, 2019.
  • Retrieved March 1, 2019.

Original release date(s):
  • ^"Archived copy".
Release years by system:
2016 – Arcade
Notes:
  • Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved April 2, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link).
  • ^ ab"Pokémon in Figures". The Pokémon Company.
  • Archived from the original on October 10, 2020.
  • Retrieved July 31, 2020. ^Pokemon Green Version - IGN, archived from the original on December 6, 2019, retrieved December 6, 2019.

Pokemon Master EX (2019)

TitleDetails

Original release dates:[67]
  • ^Super Smash Bros. Product Information.ASINB00000J2W7.
  • Retrieved April 19, 2006. ^Super Smash Bros.
Release years by system:
2015 – Arcade
2016 – Wii U
Notes:
  • Melee Unlockable character guideNintendo.com.

Original release date:[68]
  • Retrieved April 19, 2006.
Release years by system:
2017 – Nintendo Switch
Notes:
  • ^Pokemon In 2005 - IGN, retrieved July 5, 2021.

8th-Gen: Sword, Shield, Brilliant Diamond, Shining Pearl

TitleDetails

Original release date(s):
  • ^"Pokémon ships 100 million worldwide".
Release years by system:
2020 – Arcade
Notes:
  • Retrieved July 5, 2021. ^"New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut"Archived May 22, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.
  • Retrieved February 7, 2007.
  • ^Vore, Bryan (April 2009). "Pokémon Platinum review". Game Informer (192): 90. ^"Pokemon Platinum revealed, set for fall release in Japan – Joystiq".

Pokémon's Generation Timeline Isn't Based On In Game Data

TitleDetails

Original release dates:
  • Archived from the original on May 27, 2008.
  • Retrieved May 26, 2008.
  • ^Gifford, Kevin (September 3, 2008).
  • "Running the Gamut of Famitsu RPG Reviews".
Release years by system:
2009 – Wii
2016 – Wii U Virtual Console
Notes:
  • Archived from the original on October 16, 2012.

Original release dates:
  • Retrieved September 21, 2008.
  • ^"Pokémon Platinum Version".
  • Archived from the original on January 12, 2013.
  • Retrieved December 17, 2008.
Release years by system:
2011 – Wii
Notes:
  • ^"Pokémon Platinum Version". Archived from the original on July 14, 2019.
  • Retrieved March 22, 2009.
  • ^"Pokemon Platinum hits Australia this May".

Unused trademarks

Generation III (Game Boy Advance)

March 24, 2009. Archived from the original on September 14, 2011. Retrieved March 24, 2009. ^East, Tom (December 2, 2009). "News: Pokemon Platinum Release Date Confirmed". Official Nintendo Magazine. Archived from the original on March 29, 2009. Retrieved March 22, 2009. ^Tanaka, John (May 7, 2009).

"New Pokemon Games Confirmed". Archived from the original on January 12, 2013. Retrieved August 8, 2009. ^"Nintendo unveils its video game lineup for early 2010". Nintendo Canada. December 14, 2009. Archived from the original on November 25, 2010. Retrieved December 14, 2009. ^"Pokémon HeartGold Version and Pokémon SoulSilver Version release date announced!" Nintendo of Australia. January 22, 2010. Archived from the original on July 23, 2018. Retrieved January 22, 2010. ^"News: Pokémon HeartGold/SoulSilver UK release date revealed". Official Nintendo Magazine. January 12, 2010. Archived from the original on January 15, 2010. Retrieved January 12, 2010. ^"Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for WiiArchived March 24, 2007, at the Wayback Machine" Cubed3.com.

7th-Gen

Retrieved June 7, 2006. ^Goldfarb, Andrew (June 11, 2013). "E3 2013: Pokemon X & Y Release Date Announced". Archived from the original on October 15, 2013. Retrieved October 15, 2013. ^"Pokémon X and Pokémon Y announcement on Nintendo Direct". Archived from the original on September 14, 2016. Retrieved July 22, 2016. ^Quillen, Dustin (October 4, 2013).

Third generation (2002–2006)

"Pokémon X & Y Versions Revie". Archived from the original on October 14, 2013. Retrieved October 15, 2013. ^CoroCoro Comic, March 2013 Issue, Shogakukan. ^"Meet Sylveon, Pokémon X And Pokémon Y′s Eighth Eeevee Evolution". Archived from the original on October 13, 2018. Retrieved February 14, 2013. ^Scullion, Chris (May 7, 2014). "Pokemon Ruby & Sapphire remakes coming to 3DS". Archived from the original on May 8, 2014. Retrieved May 7, 2014. ^"Pokkén Tournament, A Pokémon Fighting Game, Announced For Arcades". Archived from the original on July 23, 2018. Retrieved August 26, 2014. ^Statt, Nick (July 5, 2016). "Pokémon Go is now rolling out for iOS and Android". Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved November 5, 2019. ^Frank, Allegra (February 26, 2016). "Pokémon Sun and Moon officially unveiled, out later this year".

8th-Gen

Archived from the original on February 27, 2016. Retrieved February 27, 2016. ^"Pokémon Ultra Sun and Pokémon Ultra Moon | Pokémon Video Games". www.pokemon.com. Archived from the original on July 5, 2017. Retrieved June 26, 2017. ^Gartenberg, Chaim (June 13, 2017). "A proper Pokémon game is coming to the Nintendo Switch". Archived from the original on June 13, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2017. ^"Pokémon on Nintendo Switch is Due '2018 or Later', But That's No Surprise". Archived from the original on April 30, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018. ^"Nintendo Still Lists Pokemon Switch Release Date as "2018 or Later"". April 26, 2018. Archived from the original on April 30, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018. ^ abCraddock, Ryan (April 16, 2018). "Official Nintendo Magazine Confirms Pokémon On Switch Will Be 'Generation Eight'". Archived from the original on April 30, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018. ^ abFarokhmanesh, Megan (May 29, 2018). "Another Pokémon game is still coming in 2019". Archived from the original on May 30, 2018. Retrieved May 30, 2018. ^ abDeFreitas, Casey (May 29, 2018). "Core Pokemon RPG Coming to Nintendo Switch 2019". Archived from the original on May 30, 2018.

PokéPark series (2009 – 2011)

Retrieved May 30, 2018. ^"Pokèmon 2019 won't be influenced by Pokémon GO". Archived from the original on June 1, 2018. Retrieved June 1, 2018. ^"Core RPG Pokemon Switch 2019 Game 'Will NOT Be Influenced by Pokemon Go'". Archived from the original on June 1, 2018. Retrieved June 1, 2018. ^Webster, Andrew (February 27, 2019). "Pokémon Sword and Shield are coming to the Switch this year". Archived from the original on February 27, 2019. Retrieved February 27, 2019. ^Webster, Andrew (June 5, 2019). "Pokémon Sword and Shield will launch on November 15th".

2nd-Gen: Gold, Silver, and Crystal

Archived from the original on December 16, 2019. Retrieved October 4, 2019. ^Bonifacic, Igor (January 9, 2020). "'Pokémon Sword' and 'Shield' are getting an expansion pass".

Pokémon Go (2016)

Archived from the original on January 9, 2020. Retrieved January 9, 2020. ^Pokémon [@Pokemon] (November 26, 2020). "Need one more thing to be thankful for today, Trainers? Our Pokémon 25th Anniversary celebration kicks off in 2021! Stay tuned for more details 😉 #Pokemon25" (Tweet). Archived from the original on November 28, 2020.

2nd-Gen

Retrieved November 29, 2020 – via Twitter. ^"Pokemon Scarlet and Pokemon Violet Announced for Late 2022". Retrieved February 27, 2022. ^Webster, Andrew (November 16, 2017). "The new Pokémon games on the Nintendo 3DS are the most welcoming yet".

1st-Gen: Red, Green, Blue, and Yellow

Archived from the original on July 22, 2019. Retrieved December 6, 2019. ^Pokémon Ruby review (page 1)Archived March 10, 2007, at the Wayback MachineGamespy.com. Accessed May 30, 2006. ^Pokémon Yellow Critical ReviewArchived September 29, 2006, at the Wayback MachineIgn.com. Retrieved March 27, 2006. ^"Pokémon X and Y: How to get all of the starters". October 17, 2013. Archived from the original on December 6, 2019. Retrieved December 6, 2019. ^"Virtually Overlooked: Mario Artist". Archived from the original on July 23, 2018. Retrieved January 8, 2018. ^ abcTop 10 of Everything 2017. London, England: Hachette UK. October 6, 2016. ISBN978-0600633747. Retrieved April 25, 2017. ^"Pokemon Red Version for Game Boy - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on April 5, 2019. Retrieved January 18, 2019. ^"Pokemon Blue Version for Game Boy - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on December 9, 2019. Retrieved January 18, 2019.

4th-Gen: Diamond, Pearl, Platinum, SoulSilver, HeartGold

^"Pokemon Yellow Version: Special Pikachu Edition for Game Boy - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on December 16, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2019. ^"約4年ぶり! ポケモン完全新作が2010年内発売へ|ライフ関連ニュース|オリコン顧客満足度ランキング". ORICON NEWS (in Japanese).

Connectivity

Generation IV (Nintendo DS)

^"Pokemon Gold Version for Game Boy Colour - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on December 5, 2018.

Second generation (1999–2002)

Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Pokemon Silver Version for Game Boy Colour - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 20, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Pokemon Crystal Version for Game Boy Colour - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on June 4, 2019.

Ninth generation (2022–)

Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^ abRose, Mike (October 15, 2013). "Pokemon X & Y sell 4M copies in first weekend". Think Services. Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Pokemon Ruby Version for Game Boy Advance - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 20, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Pokemon Sapphire Version for Game Boy Advance - GameRankings".

Detective Pikachu (2016)

www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 20, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Pokemon Ruby Version for Game Boy Advance Reviews - Metacritic". www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on November 26, 2018. Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Pokemon FireRed Version for Game Boy Advance - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 20, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Pokemon LeafGreen Version for Game Boy Advance - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com.

Pokémon

Archived from the original on January 20, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Pokemon FireRed Version for Game Boy Advance Reviews - Metacritic". www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on February 6, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Pokemon LeafGreen Version for Game Boy Advance Reviews - Metacritic".

Eighth generation (2019–2022)

www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on January 24, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Million-Seller Titles of NINTENDO Products"(pdf). Ltd.Archived(PDF) from the original on September 27, 2007. Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Pokemon Emerald Version for Game Boy Advance - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 20, 2019.

Release model

Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^"Pokemon Emerald Version for Game Boy Advance Reviews - Metacritic". www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on February 2, 2019.

Generation V (Nintendo DS)

Fourth generation (2006–2010)

Retrieved January 20, 2019. ^ abc"Top Selling Software Sales Units - Nintendo DS Software".

Generation II (Game Boy Color)

Archived from the original on April 25, 2017. Retrieved May 9, 2020.

3rd-Gen

^"Pokemon Diamond Version for DS - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com.

6th-Gen: X, Y, Omega Ruby, Alpha Sapphire

Archived from the original on January 20, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2019.

Generation IX (Nintendo Switch)

^"Pokemon Pearl Version for DS - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com.

Sixth generation (2013–2016)

Archived from the original on January 20, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2019.

Main Pokémon Games in Chronological Order

^"Pokemon Diamond Version for DS Reviews - Metacritic".

www.metacritic.com.

Archived from the original on December 4, 2018.

Retrieved January 20, 2019.

^"Pokemon Pearl Version for DS Reviews - Metacritic".

www.metacritic.com.

Archived from the original on February 3, 2019.

Retrieved January 20, 2019.

^"Financial Results Briefing for Fiscal Year Ended March 2010"(PDF).

Archived(PDF) from the original on July 21, 2011.

Do You Need to Play Pokémon Games in Order?

Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Platinum Version for DS - GameRankings".

Box art

TitleDetails

Original release date:
  • www.gamerankings.com.
Release years by system:
2002 - Sega Pico
Archived from the original on October 26, 2012. Retrieved January 21, 2019.

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2003 - Sega Pico
^"Pokemon Platinum Version for DS Reviews - Metacritic".

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2004 - Sega Pico

1st-Gen

TitleDetails
www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on December 4, 2018.

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2005 - Advanced Pico Beena
Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon HeartGold Version for DS - GameRankings".

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2007 - Advanced Pico Beena
www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on October 26, 2012.

Original release date:[90]
Release years by system:
2009 - Advanced Pico Beena
Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon SoulSilver Version for DS - GameRankings".

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2010 - Advanced Pico Beena

Pokémon Generations

TitleDetails

Original release dates:
  • www.gamerankings.com.
  • Archived from the original on October 26, 2012.
  • Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  • ^"Pokemon HeartGold Version for DS Reviews - Metacritic".
Release years by system:
2004 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • www.metacritic.com.
  • Archived from the original on February 3, 2019.

Original release date:
  • Retrieved January 21, 2019.
Release years by system:
2006 – Mobile phone
Notes:
  • ^"Pokemon SoulSilver Version for DS Reviews - Metacritic".
  • www.metacritic.com.

Original release dates:
  • Archived from the original on January 25, 2019.
  • Retrieved January 21, 2019.
Release years by system:
2011 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • ^"Pokemon Black Version for DS - GameRankings".
  • www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.

Original release dates:[91]
  • Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  • ^"Pokemon White Version for DS - GameRankings".
  • www.gamerankings.com.
  • Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.
Release years by system:
2012 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  • ^"Pokemon Black Version for DS Reviews - Metacritic".
  • www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on December 4, 2018.

Original release dates:
  • Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  • ^"Pokemon White Version for DS Reviews - Metacritic".
  • www.metacritic.com.
  • Archived from the original on December 4, 2018.
Release years by system:
2014 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Retrieved January 21, 2019.

Original release date(s):
  • ^Phillips, Tom (January 30, 2013).
  • "Nintendo cuts Wii U sales forecast by 1.5 million, says console having "a negative impact on profits"".
  • Archived from the original on September 7, 2017.
  • Retrieved January 21, 2018.
Release years by system:
2016 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • ^"Pokemon Black Version 2 for DS - GameRankings".
  • www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon White Version 2 for DS - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.

Original release date(s):
  • Retrieved January 21, 2019.
Release years by system:
2017 – Android, iOS

Original release date(s):
  • ^"Pokemon Black Version 2 for DS Reviews - Metacritic".
Release years by system:
2018 - Nintendo Switch, Android, iOS
Notes:
  • www.metacritic.com.

Original release date(s):
  • Archived from the original on January 24, 2019.
Release years by system:
2021 - Nintendo Switch, iOS, Android
Notes:
  • Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon White Version 2 for DS Reviews - Metacritic".

Generations

  1. www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on January 10, 2019.
  2. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^ abcd"Top Selling Software Sales Units - Nintendo 3DS Software".
  3. Archived from the original on October 31, 2017.
  4. Retrieved May 9, 2020. ^"Pokemon X for 3DS - GameRankings".
  5. www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.
  6. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Y for 3DS - GameRankings".
  7. www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.
  8. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon X for 3DS Reviews - Metacritic".
  9. www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on February 6, 2019.
  10. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Y for 3DS Reviews - Metacritic".
  11. www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on January 25, 2019.
  12. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Omega Ruby for 3DS - GameRankings".
  13. www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.
  14. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Alpha Sapphire for 3DS - GameRankings".
  15. www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.
  16. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Omega Ruby for 3DS Reviews - Metacritic".
  17. www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on November 30, 2018.
  18. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Sun for 3DS - GameRankings".
  19. www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.
  20. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Moon for 3DS - GameRankings".
  21. www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.
  22. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Sun for 3DS Reviews - Metacritic".
  23. www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on November 24, 2018.
  24. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Moon for 3DS Reviews - Metacritic".
  25. www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on February 7, 2019.
  26. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Ultra Sun for 3DS - GameRankings".
  27. www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.
  28. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Ultra Moon for 3DS - GameRankings".
  29. www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.
  30. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Ultra Sun for 3DS Reviews - Metacritic".

Notes

  1. www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on November 30, 2018.
  2. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Ultra Moon for 3DS Reviews - Metacritic".
  3. www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on February 7, 2019. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^ ab"Top Selling Software Sales Units - Nintendo Switch Software".
  4. Archived from the original on January 30, 2020. Retrieved May 9, 2020. ^"Pokemon Let's Go, Pikachu!
  5. for Nintendo Switch - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019.
  6. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Let's Go, Eevee! for Nintendo Switch - GameRankings". www.gamerankings.com.
  7. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Let's Go, Pikachu!
  8. for Nintendo Switch Reviews - Metacritic". www.metacritic.com. Archived from the original on December 26, 2018.
  9. Retrieved January 21, 2019. ^"Pokemon Let's Go, Eevee! for Nintendo Switch Reviews - Metacritic". www.metacritic.com. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  10. ^"Video Game Reviews, Articles, Trailers and more - Metacritic". Archived from the original on November 28, 2019. Retrieved November 28, 2019.
  11. ^"Pokemon Sword for Switch Reviews". Archived from the original on November 15, 2019. Retrieved November 19, 2019. ^"Pokemon Shield for Switch Reviews".
  12. Archived from the original on March 6, 2021. Retrieved November 19, 2019. ^"Pikachu out of pocket".
  13. Next Generation. Electronic Gaming Monthly. ^"The Total Sales for Pokémon Are Staggering".
  14. Archived from the original on April 10, 2016. Retrieved April 14, 2016. ^Whitehead, Thomas (March 18, 2016).
  15. "The Pokémon Company Confirms Outstanding Lifetime Sales For The Franchise". Archived from the original on March 20, 2016.
  16. Retrieved March 18, 2016. ^Clodfelter, Tim (April 17, 2008). "Record Book Focused on the Gamers". Winston-Salem Journal. Archived from the original on January 27, 2013.
  17. Retrieved October 18, 2008. ^Carlisle, Rodney P (2009). Encyclopedia of Play in Today's Society.
  18. SAGE Publications. ^The News & Features Team (December 4, 2006).
  19. "The Top 25 Videogame Franchises". Archived from the original on December 28, 2011.
  20. Retrieved July 21, 2010. ^Henry Gilbert (August 30, 2010). Nintendo games not made by Nintendo, Pokémon Black / White DS Features".
  21. Archived from the original on July 3, 2012. Retrieved September 1, 2010. ^"Pokemon Game Veteran Junichi Masuda Recalls 'Most Nerve-Racking Moment'".
  22. NDTV Gadgets360.com. Archived from the original on April 7, 2019. Retrieved September 29, 2018. Official Japanese website(in Japanese). Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pokémon_(video_game_series)&oldid=1081338658".
  23. Pokémon is the highest-grossing media franchise of all time. Satoshi Tajiri created the first games, Pokémon Red and Pokémon Green, in 1996. A year later, studio OLM, Inc. turned the video-game series into anime.
  24. Following its Japanese meaning (Pocket Monsters), it’s only natural that the main Pokémon games are RPGs for portable consoles. The main series follows young Pokémon trainers as they compete in tournaments, rise in ranks, and catch Pokémons.
  25. Meanwhile, trainers crush the plans of evil organizations like Team Rocket or Team Plasma. Pokémon games are Nintendo exclusives. Game Freak studio creates the handheld games, whereas other studios like Niantic takes care of the console and smartphone spin-offs.
  26. The main series happens across 8 generations. Each gen relates to a console age and covers a period within the Pokémon mythos. Similarly, each generation introduces a new set of Pokémons, regions, characters, and RPG mechanics.
  27. These changes come with a duo or trio of Pokémon games. Additionally, each generation introduces a new iteration of Pokémon media. These are, for example, console spin-off titles or anime seasons in the same region as the games.
  28. Here’s the chronological order of the generational titles:. Pokémon Red and Green (Japanese version) – (1996). Pokémon Red and Blue (1997). Pokémon Yellow (1998).
  29. Pokémon Gold and Silver (2000). Pokémon Crystal (2001). Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire (2002).
  30. Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen (2004) – REMAKE. Pokémon Emerald (2004). Pokémon Diamond and Pearl (2006).
  31. Pokémon Platinum (2008). Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver (2009) – REMAKE.
  32. Pokémon Black and White (2011). Pokémon Black 2 and White 2 (2012). Pokémon X and Y (2013).
  33. Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire (2014) – REMAKE.
  34. Pokémon Sun and Moon (2016). Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon (2017) – REMAKE.
  35. Pokémon Let’s Go Pikachu / Let’s Go Eevee (2018) – REMAKE. Pokémon Sword and Shield (2019).
  36. Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl -(2021 debut) – REMAKE. The grand total is 31 games of the main Pokémon saga, including both originals and remakes.
  37. Aside from the handheld games, there’re perhaps over a hundred Pokémon games throughout Nintendo’s history.
  38. I’ll put some order into it, but I’m leaving some of the spin-off titles behind.
  39. The “Chromatic” generation debuted in 1996 for Game Boy. The first two editions were Red and Green, with Charizard and Venasaur on the covers, respectively.
  40. The Green edition only debuted in Japan. Then came the Blue edition, with Blastoise on the cover and the American Red edition.
  41. These came out in 1998. Finally, the Yellow Special Edition debuted in 1998 as well.
  42. It features Pikachu on the cover. He’s also your character’s on-screen compassion and your starter Pokémon.
  43. The games happen in the Kanto region, and there’re 151 Pokémons to find. Your starting choices through Professor Oak are Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle.
  44. You can find the older Pokémon titles on ROM sites. The next trio of Pokémon games, Gold, Silver, and Crystal debuted around 2001, rounding up both Japanese and American release dates.
  45. These were the first games of the franchise that allowed choosing the character’s name.
  46. In particular, Crystal first ever allowed players to choose their gender. Moreover, it included additional subplots compared to Gold and Silver.
  47. Either way, the generation introduced several new Pokémons, so the game had 251 species. The new region is Johto, and starter Pokémons are Chikorita, Cyndaquil, and Totodile.
  48. The “Advanced” gen debuted for Game Boy Advance in 2002, when Nintendo released Ruby and Sapphire. Emerald debuted in 2004 with minor graphical changes and a new battle mode.
  49. These games introduced 135 new Pokémons, so the new cap became 386. There’s also a new area, Hoen.
  50. Speaking of which, the map was more detailed than ever. Other significant additions include new RPG mechanics like Pokémon Natures.
  51. Lastly, the generation introduced Fire and Green remakes (FireRed and LeafGreen) in 2004.
  52. These happen in Kanto but share traits with gen-3 games. That way, the studio made Gen I, Gen II, and Gen III compatible.
  53. Diamond and Pearl debuted in 2006 for Nintendo DS. These are at the top of the Pokémon games sale charts.
  54. Reaching the newer Nintendo DS portable consoles meant further upgrades, like using the tactile screen.
  55. Other upgrades include a Wi-Fi connection, underground locations, and a 3D game design.
  56. Most notably, the game added a day-to-night cycle with five periods.
  57. Alongside the cold-snowy mountains of the map, it created an immersive place to explore. In 2008, Pokémon Platinum debuted as a remake of both Diamond and Pearl.
  58. Another addition was a “Wi-Fi Plaza” players could visit to play mini-games. Similarly, the game introduced a GTS system that enables anonymous Pokémon trading with real players via Wi-Fi.
  59. Either game includes 107 new Pokémons, so the total number became 493.
  60. The new region was Sinnoh, and starter Pokémons were Turtwig, Chimchar, and Piplup.
  61. The fourth gen also brought remakes of Silver and Gold (SoulSilver and HeartGold) in 2009. These incorporate the changes the Nintendo DS allowed.
  62. Black, White, Black 2, and White 2 make up the “Black&White” generation.
  63. The original titles debuted in 2010 for Nintendo DS, whereas the sequels reached the market in 2012. These entries introduced 159 new Pokémons, and so the new cap became 649. There were no new Pokémons in the sequels, but the expanded area includes 300 creatures of all generations.
  64. The new region was Teselia / Unova, and the starting Pokémons were Reshiram (Black) and Zekrom (White).
  65. Lastly, the 5th-gen added significant graphical and performance upgrades over its predecessors.
  66. Pokémon X and Pokémon Y are the sixth generation. These debuted in 2013 for Nintendo 3DS.
  67. These entries added 72 new Pocket Monsters plus 48 “Mega-evolutions.” Either way, the new max number was 721.
  68. The setting is the Kalos region. The location takes inspiration from real-life locations as the Eiffel Tower turned into the Prism Tower.
  69. Other novelties included character customization options, battles against Pokémon hordes, and new RPG mechanics.
  70. More importantly, the starter Pokémons are Chespin, Fennekin, and Froakie. Lastly, the generation includes remakes of 3rd-gen games in 2014.
  71. These are Pokémon Omega Ruby and Pokémon Alpha Sapphire. As usual, the remakes and the main titles are compatible.
  72. The remakes have the advances, the “XY” gen brought forward. Also, compared to the original games, Alpha Sapphire and Omega Ruby offer players a Secret Base they can customize.
  73. Pokémon Sun and Pokémon Moon debuted for Nintendo 3DS and Nintendo 2DS in 2016. These games introduced 81 new Pokémons (grand total 802), as well as the Alola region. On top of that, Sun & Moon delivers the greatest amounts of novelties the franchise had ever seen.
  74. Some examples are PokémountsZ-Moves, and new battle and training mechanics. Another important addition was Z-Crystals, which players can earn in Gims.
  75. These enable powerful moves trainers can do once per battle. Regional Pokémons were also a significant addition. These are Pokémons with different shapes depending on the region’s climate.
  76. Lastly, starter Pokémons are Rowlet, Litten, and Popplio. In 2017, Nintendo released Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon, enhanced versions of the original 7th-gen titles.
  77. These introduced new Pokémons plus alternative storylines that focus on Pokémon Necrozma.
  78. Pokémon Sword and Pokémon Shield debuted in 2019 for Nintendo Switch. Remember, the Switch is both a handheld console and a tabletop device. The generation includes 81 new Pokémons, plus 13 new regional forms.
  79. That means, currently, there’re about 883 Pokémons. Once again, the area is Kanto, and the starter Pokémons are Grookey, Scorbunny, and Sobble.
  80. In 2020, Nintendo released expansions for both games: Armor Island and The Crown Tundra. Later on, Nintendo released a re-edition of the original games, which includes the expansion content.
  81. The re-editions are the ones you’d find today. As novelties, Sword and Shield changed how random encounters function. Instead of fighting against wild Pokémons when walking in grass, wild Pokémons walk free in the world.
  82. Additionally, the games added an open-world area. The games excluded some old additions, like Z Moves and mega-evolutions. In return, they added new concepts like Galar regional forms and “Dynamax,” a mechanic that allows Pokémon to grow in giant sizes temporarily.
  83. ILCA studio is currently working on 4th-gen game remakes. You can pre-order Pokémon Brilliant Diamond or Pokémon Shining Pearl. These will debut for the Nintendo Wii in late 2021 and offer a Chibi-style design (cutesy miniature models).
  84. Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl are the only Pokémon games of the main series not made by Game Freak.
  85. Here’s the trailer:. Spin-off games offer some extra features to Pokémon fans. Notably, they allow you to fill the Pokedex, as well as trading (or fighting) Pocket Monsters between compatible consoles and handheld games.
  86. Pokémon Stadium debuted for Nintendo 64 in the year 2000. It’s about arena Pokémon combat in 3D.
  87. Players could transfer their Pocket Monsters from Red, Blue, and Yellow versions. Pokémon Trading Card Game premiered for the Game Boy Color in 1996.
  88. It’s about collecting cards of the original 151 Pokémons. Pokémon Stadium 2 debuted in 2001 for Nintendo 64. It adds new game modes, minor graphical upgrades, and the second-gen Pokémons.
  89. Pokémon Colosseum belongs to 3rd-gen games. It debuted in 2004 for Nintendo GameCube. Genius Sonority studio was behind the title.
  90. Colosseum offers a single-player campaign, as well as Pokémon duels. More importantly, it allows players to use their Game Boy Advance creatures.
  91. Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness is Colosseum’s sequel. It debuted in 2005 for GameCube.

List of Pokémon main series games

  • This RPG game continues the story of the first title, which is capturing “Shadow” Pokémon.
Pokémon Box debuted for GameCube in 2004. It’s a simple storing center for your Ruby, Sapphire, and Pearl Pokémons.
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